This study is an attempt to systematically study the intra-household implications and issues of climate-related shocks or hazards. We look at how the internal dynamics of decision making within the household and the joint adaptive action of household members (particularly the husband and wife) affect outcomes/risks for different groups and individuals within the household itself. The areas covered in the study are three municipalities in the province of Bohol, Philippines. Coastal erosion and sea level rise appear to be the most apparent threats in all the study sites, although other climate hazards such as typhoons, flooding, and saltwater intrusion are also felt. This paper provides a relatively clear picture of the vulnerable condition of people living in selected coastal areas in Bohol, Philippines. Perhaps, social protection in the form of insurance to fisherfolk could be developed so that they can recover from shocks, as this may be better than the usual dole-out system. Building more resilient communities does not only mean capacitating the local officials but also providing more inclusive disaster and risk reduction strategies. The role of women and children must be integrated into the whole plan as their needs are different from those of men during and after calamities.

Intra-household Impacts of Climate Change Hazards and Autonomous Adaptation: Evidence from Bohol, Philippines
Intra-household Impacts of Climate Change Hazards and Autonomous Adaptation: Evidence from Bohol, Philippines